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IRISH ARTISTS & ILLUSTRATION 1830-1930

Caption: Thomas Moore: The Author of "Lalla Rookh"

Caption:
Thomas Moore: The Author of "Lalla Rookh"
Artist:
Maclise, Daniel
Materials:
Paper (fiber material), Ink
Techniques:
Lithographic Reproduction
Author:
Bates, William
Title of Publication:
A gallery of illustrious literary characters
Publisher:
Chatto and Windus
Publication place:
London
Publication date:
1873
Curator Comment:
This image of the composer Thomas Moore is from is from a volume entitled 'A Gallery of Illustrious literary characters' (1873) and contains portraits and biographical sketches that were originally published in 'Fraser’s Magazine'. This publication was a general and literary Tory journal founded by Corkman, William McGinn and Hugh Fraser. McGinn edited the periodical until his death in 1842. Maclise, as a contributing illustrator (who submitted under the pseudonym of Alfred Croquis) was closely associated with the magazine and he was part of its social and intellectual circle after he arrived in London in 1827. Born in Dublin, Moore attended Trinity College, graduating in 1798. The following year he travelled to England to study law. A man of letters and music, he rose to fame in London, where he promoted a romantic form of Irish nationalism among London society. Moore's hugely popular 'Irish Melodies' was published in ten parts between 1807 and 1834. Daniel Maclise illustrated an editon in 1845, his imagery incorporating nationalist symbols including the harp, round towers and shamrocks. The original illustration was produced as a lithograph.
Note on artwork:
'Lalla Rookh' was a popular eastern romance by Thomas Moore, published in 1817. The title is taken from the name of the heroine, the daughter of the 17th-century Mughal emperor Aurangzeb. In this whole length portrait of Moore, Maclise positions him at a table,in the act of writing with a pen in his right hand, and a book under his left. The figure looks to right, right foot on a cushion.
References:
ONDB online and DIB online and Grove Art online and Strickland


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